I’ve been working on Anyang Public Art Project so called APAP with Argentinean architect, Mauricio Corbalan, and we went to this abandoned market place in Bisan-dong, Anyang City, the other day to arrange a possible interview with this old couple who run a restaurant in an abandoned market place.

The lunch time was getting close, Mauricio and I ordered Konguksu, the only dish they serve in the summer. As we started small talks with them, the old couple offered us some beer and told us a bit about the market and their stories – how busy the market was when they started the restaurant back in December, 1971, how well their business went, and how they were able to make enough money to bring up and educate all of their four children.

Things started changing sometime last year since the city announced the re-development of the area. Most of the shops in the market closed the businesses and the market is almost abandoned now. There were still regular customers who come to reminisce the good old times, however, it doesn’t seem like it would last long enough.

Visiting the market place made me think once again, how quickly things change, and how closely our lives evolve with the changes of environments. It is sad that it’s not only the environment we lose when places disappear and it doesn’t seem like we realize what they are until we lose them.

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semame oil extracting machines

sesame oils.

almost abandoned.

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4 comments.

  1. This post makes me feel very nostalgic. I haven’t seen those machines in 6th photo in 10 years, that’s the one to extract sesame oil, right?
    It’s so sad how this market with a long history is practically abandoned now..

  2. Thanks for the comment. It is sesame oil extract machine. I think the last time i saw it was like 20 years ago. It is sad to see things disappear.

  3. Hi, I found your blog through MountainBread (Yeonsang). Your photos are just lovely and have me missing Korea badly. One thing I noticed during my last visit was the strange co-existence of ultra modern with historic, traditional Korea and for the latter to be slowly phasing out is saddening. I’d much rather walk through a bustling, teeming Gwangjang marketplace than some slick, shiny steel supercenter. Looking forward to seeing more of your photography!

  4. these are incredible photos

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